Tag Archives: Bhagavad Gita

best laid plans

Best Laid Plans of Mice and Men…

Best Laid Plans of Mice and Men…

This last week approaching my book release date (which, by the way, is not happening tomorrow) has reminded me of a section of my book about contrast. Things can’t always go the way we expect and we have to try and be okay with it. Easier said than done, yes. But certainly possible. And easier on the stomach.

best laid plans

Here is an excerpt from Chapter One of my book, In So Many Words, not coming out tomorrow as originally planned.

“Out of all the books we studied, there is one that changed my life and continues to resonate with me. Along with The Bhagavad Gita, we read one of its companion books, Poised for Grace, by Douglas Brooks. First of all, who would have thought that I would read The Bhagavad Gita ever in my life? Not me! But now, it serves as the basis of many of the decisions I make and the way I feel about difficult situations. In fact, there is a note in
the margin of my companion book which actually reads…This is the meaning of life! It doesn’t matter if it is the meaning of life for you or anyone else. It is for me and that’s perfectly fine. Perception is relative. I wouldn’t have accepted that concept ten years ago.
The Bhagavad Gita, among many other teachings, discusses the need for contrast. There is evil in this world. Horrible things happen. People do unspeakable things. Those things make us angry, sad, and discouraged. But, in actuality, we NEED those things. We need to feel and understand the contrast between good and evil, happy and sad, right and wrong. Imagine if we lived in a utopia, always feeling bliss and divine connection. We
would never know the opposite, therefore never really knowing the grace of divinity. We must feel the contrast in order to know what feels good to us and what does not. Without it, that land of perfection eventually shrivels away and is lost completely. We need free will in order to make choices. It is kind of a system of checks and balances. In my Kula, we concluded the following: Without knowing what you aren’t, you cannot know what you are.”