Tag Archives: resources

how to make

How To Make Important Decisions About Email Marketing

An article from emma caught my eye as I was searching for information on good email marketing strategies. As a visual person, I was most intrigued by the ideas about the use of font, color, and images. You can greatly influence the impression your business portrays and the desired emotions and actions of your reader by paying close attention to these content characteristics.

In looking at the best choices for my Yoga business, I see that a Modern font might be best, as it portrays a “chic vibe” and is “less traditional”. The color Blue works for my marketing strategy as it is calming and evokes trust. Apparently I’ve been doing something right by including images of people doing yoga in my classes or clients receiving Reiki treatments in my home studio. I always thought of that as a great way to invite others into my classes and sessions.

Emma has a myriad of articles, webinars, podcasts, and professional services. I encourage you to read this article and others, watch a demo, and ask questions about their various membership options. In the meantime, enjoy learning about how the simple use of fonts, colors, and images can make your email marketing content all that much better!

_______________________________________________

Excerpt from this article in their Resources/Blog section:

What font should I choose?

Choosing a font is an important decision when creating an email marketing campaign, and it isn’t one that should be taken lightly. When you go through the font styles, you must keep your company in mind.

Are you marketing a young, bright clothing store? Or are you marketing a doctor’s office? 

Source: Campaign Monitor

No matter what it is you are advertising, there’s a font that will fit your needs.

Let’s take a look at the different types of fonts that are available and what kind of vibe they can emulate in your marketing campaign:

Serif: This type of font is great for companies that are creating campaigns that show they are respectable and reliable.

Sans Serif: Fonts that fall under this category gives the reader a sense of stability. It shows that the business is clean and objective.

Script: When you use fonts that are considered script, you can create content that is seen as elegant and affectionate. 

Modern: If you are looking to emulate strength in your email marketing campaign, modern fonts will be the right choice for you. They put off a progressive and chic vibe that attracts those who are less traditional. 

Which colors should I use?

Colors and human psychology interact with each other daily, and it will have a significant impact on the success of your email marketing campaigns. 

Source: Campaign Monitor

There is no right or wrong color, but it’s important to use the colors that correlate with the emotion you’re looking to achieve.

Red: Gives a sense of urgency and increases the viewer’s heart rate and adrenaline. If you’re looking for them to make an urgent decision, like a CTA, choosing a red button would be a great choice.

Orange: This color is associated with emotions that are fun and happy. It provides warmth and optimism to your content and will work well with campaigns looking to provoke that kind of emotion.

Blue: Using the color blue provides a calming sensation, which is why doctor’s offices and hospitals are usually complemented with hints of blue. It emulates the feeling of trust and loyalty.

Green: Gives the feeling of growth because of its association with nature. It’s a balanced color that can also put off the feeling of growth from a financial point-of-view. 

The psychology behind colors can be fluid because individuals can have their own associations with different colors. However, it is pretty standard to use the previous list as guidelines to help you choose the perfect color scheme for your campaign.

What image should I include?

Let’s be honest–most of the time, your users are skimming your emails. Everyone is on-the-go, so that means everyone is glancing at their loaded inboxes without much thought. That’s where the importance of your design comes into play.

Source: Campaign Monitor 

It’s crucial to choose the right image for your email, but how do you know which one is the right one? 

The hero image you choose should depict the message you’re trying to deliver within the content of your email. It kind of gives your reader a little hint as to what to expect from that email. 
Images of other people is a great way to engage with your users, and pictures of an event you may be covering could also be a great avenue to take. But with the number of industries that exist, there is no image that can cover all of the bases. So, it’s up to you to decide what is right for your specific campaign.

No matter if your image is of a plate of food, a concert, or of a kitten – be confident that your image will draw people in and contribute to the message you’re trying to deliver.

______________________________________

Read the entire article here.


behind the scenes

Behind the Scenes of My Depression and Anxiety

Luckily, I’m one of those people who has no problem giving others a behind the scenes look at my life with depression and anxiety. In fact, I get a kick out of revealing how it all started. There’s no doubt that I had it in my genes long before, but this one life-changing event triggered it. My grandmother, father, and all three of my brothers live/lived with it as well. We all handled it differently. Some with unconventional means and some with the proper channels of therapy, medication, and lifestyle changes. Either way, we’ve all survived. Grandma lived a long, happy life and we have fond memories of her sense of humor, generosity, love, and yummy midnight snacks.

For me, it started in the fall of 1986. I was just starting my second year of college at age 19. Sure, I considered myself an adult, but I was soon to find out that I was still just a teenager with a strong connection to my parents. I was in the “cool” dorm bunking with two friends. Over the summer, I had started dating a Marine, in a long-distance relationship. (Bad idea.) I was ready for an amazing year.

My parents called with the bombshell.

They were moving from my childhood home in Virginia (90 miles from college) to Newport Beach, California (about 3000 miles). And here’s the kicker…they assumed I would just move with them. In hindsight, maybe I should have. But, no. I was a mature young adult. I was in college. I had friends. I was deciding on my major. I was having a great time. And, of course, I had a boyfriend. After many arguments, they let me stay. And they bought me a car.

And that’s when the proverbial shit hit the fan.

Almost immediately, the depression and anxiety set in. I found myself crying all the time and a lot of mornings, unable to get out of bed. And guess who I called. My parents. Rightfully so, they had one answer…move to California. I still wouldn’t do it. I was determined to ride this out on my own. So, I did that. With lots of drinking and partying. Somehow I managed to get to class and dance rehearsals. Don’t really know how. I’m sure my dance program was a good outlet for the way I was feeling.

And what the heck was I feeling? Sad? Angry? Abandoned? Caught off guard? Treated unfairly? To this day, I really don’t know that I can give a label to what I was feeling. It was a physical and emotional attack that came without warning. I believe it was living inside me and had a damn good reason to surface.

The story continues with moves, transfers, break-ups, tons of phone calls, a couple visits to California, psychiatrists, moving in with my sister, more drinking, more partying, more bad relationships, a failed marriage, etc, etc, etc, until the day I had a full-blown panic attack and finally, finally, took this thing seriously and started to turn my life around.

That was in 2001. Fourteen years. I suffered. Just because I was stubborn.

The one saving grace that surely helped me through all of this was the communication with my parents. Yes, we disagreed. Yes, I made decisions that made them cringe. Yes, they wanted grab me up and take me under their care. But they let me find my own way without judgment and with an open line of communication.


An article from Palmer Lake Recovery, Parents Guide: How To Help Your Teen Cope With Mental Health Issues, is an excellent resource. It discusses statistics, warning signs, causes, how to help, and useful resources.

Some ideas from the article that my parents handled well:

“A good starting point for you as a parent is to have a conversation with your teen in a constructive way that is non-confrontational and is focused on offering them the love and support that they may well need more than ever.”

“Your teen needs the sort of parental support that lets them know they are not facing their struggles alone and that you are there to support them through this difficult time. It is equally important that parents also have a support network they can call upon.”

behind the scenes